Exotica in Washington

 On September 9th, the Museum kicked off its Washington, D.C. Seminar Program at Mie n Yu restaurant in Georgetown (31st and M Street, NW), with the presentation “From the Pacific Rim to the Silk Road – How to Make Exotic Cocktails.” Museum members Phil Greene and Derek Brown joined Tom Brown of Cork and Chris Kelly of Mie N Yu to discuss the use of exotic ingredients in cocktail history, especially the British colonial regime in India and drinks like the Government Regulation Punch, the introduction to bars of ice in the 19th century, the rise of Tiki culture through progenitors Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic, and the introduction of that obscure Russian spirit called vodka in the Moscow Mule. They also discussed the use of herbs and spices in cocktails, topped off by a five spice infused rum drink called the Rum Route. Delicious pork and shrimp appetizers as an excellent accompaniment to the drinks served.

Sponsors included Domaine de Canton French Ginger Liqueur, which Phil Greene used in making a variation on the Moscow Mule he called the Indochine Mule, and which Tom Brown featured in making a scratch Ginger Mojito;

Depaz Rhum Agricole , which Phil used in his authentic Mai Tai, and which starred in the five spice Rum Route cocktail; and,

Finlandia Vodka, which worked beautifully in the Indochine Mule cocktail.

Fee Brothers also chipped in, namely, their excellent Orgeat Syrup (used in the Mai Tai), as well as their new Rhubarb Bitters. Ledroit Brands donated Batavia Arrack, Allspice Dram and Velvet Falernum.

The Museum is grateful to Mie n Yu for its excellent job at hosting, and we hope to do many more events with them down the road.

Here’s the recipe for Phil’s Indochine Mule:

Indochine Mule

  • 2 oz Finlandia Vodka
  • 2 oz. Domaine de Canton French Ginger Liqueur
  • 1 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1 oz. seltzer water

    Build drink in a copper mug, or a rocks glass, over ice. Stir well, garnish w/a sprig of mint, a dash of Angostura bitters are optional. Enjoy!

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