B&B and MOTAC

In 1937, a bartender at the "21" Club in New York created a cocktail called B&B by combining the French liqueur Benedictine with brandy. It became so popular the Benedictine company started bottling a version made with cognac themselves. In March, B&B culminated its 70th anniversary celebration with a big do at the same "21" Club, aided by the Museum and a few of its friends: Phil Greene, John Myers, LeNell Smothers and Naren Young. MC Gary (Regan) oversaw the MOTAC competition, and Dale DeGroff led the judging. Here are the cocktails, led by the winner from John Myers (who is currently at work on the guide, "What Would Jesus Drink: Cocktails for the Second Coming.”)

 
(Gary, John, Naren, LeNell,… and Phil)

THE TOUCHABLE

By John Myers

  • 1 oz. B&B
  • 1 oz. Bacardi 8-Year-Old
  • 1/2 oz. Noilly Pratt
  • 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz Grade A amber maple syrup

    Shake all ingredients over ice and strain into a Martini glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

    THE CLAIBORNE COCKTAIL

    By Phil Greene

  • 1 oz. B&B
  • 1 oz. Maker’s Mark Bourbon
  • .5 oz. Martini & Rossi Italian Sweet Vermouth
  • 2-3 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
  • 2-3 dashes Angostura Bitters

    In a rocks glass, add ice and set aside. In a pint glass, add ice, then add all ingredients. Stir well, then strain into rocks glass. Twist a lemon rind over drink, then drop it in and serve.

    SPICE MARKET

    By Naren Young

  • 2 oz. Wild Turkey rye
  • 3/4 oz. B&B
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon
  • 3/4 oz. clove & vanilla syrup
  • 1 egg white

    Shake all ingredients very hard with ice. Strain into a small wine goblet. Finish with grated nutmeg

    LENELL SPECIAL

    By Tonya Smothers

  • 2 oz. B&B
  • 1/2 oz. M&R Dry Vermouith
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice, strained
  • 1 egg white
  • three squirts of atomized Angostura Bitters

    Put egg white in shaker and shake for about five seconds to emulsify. Add spirit and strained juice. Shake hard with ice. Pour into a 9 ounce cocktail glass filled with crushed ice. Top with dashes of bitters.

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